Monday, September 4, 2017

09/04 STEVEN RAICHLEN, BUSH'S BBQ BOOTCAMP, BRIAN TALLEY, TALLEY VINEYARDS, GABE GARCIA, TIERRA SUR AT HERZOG WINE CELLARS

HOST OF PROJECT SMOKE ON PBS AND BUSH'S BBQ BOOTCAMP STEVEN RAICHLEN JOINS THE SHOW!

As host of Project Smoke on PBS and Bush’s BBQ Bootcamp, Steven created four grilling personalities/alter egos to help grillers embrace another culinary side when manning the flames: be it a rebel, an aficionado, an adventurer, or a problem solver. Which one do you think you’ll listeners will mostly identify with?

  1. The Rebel: breaks from the norm, does food in a bold new way
  2. The Aficionado: eager to bring common grilling foods to a new level of classiness
  3. The Adventurer: works with international flavor and explores new cultures
  4. The Problem Solver: can make meals happen w/ limited resources

By late summer, grillers have exhausted their go-to recipes and Steven can talk through each personality and share tips on how listeners can be more rebellious, classy, adventurous and resourceful (+ a few recipes!).

Steven is also author of 30+ cookbooks including the Barbecue Bible, Project Smoke – and his newest released just this summer, Barbecue Sauces, Rubs, and Marinades.

WWW.BUSHBEANS.COM

BRIAN TALLEY - OWNER/WINEGROWER , TALLEY VINEYARDS - NEW COOKBOOK, OUR CALIFORNIA TABLE: CELEBRATING THE SEASONS WITH THE TALLEY FAMILY

For three generations the Talley family has farmed in Coastal San Luis Obispo County. The tradition began in 1948 when Oliver Talley founded Talley Farms and started growing specialty vegetables in the Arroyo Grande Valley. During the 1970s extensive planting of wine grapes began in the neighboring Edna Valley and Santa Barbara County areas.  After observation and extensive analysis, Oliver's son, Don Talley, was convinced of the potential to grow high quality chardonnay and pinot noir on the steep hillsides above Talley Farms.  Don planted a small test plot in 1982 on the west hillside of the Rincon Vineyard that included chardonnay, pinot noir, riesling, sauvignon blanc and cabernet sauvignon. Over time the varietal and clonal selections were refined and planting expanded to a total of 190 acres in the Arroyo Grande and Edna Valleys.

Talley Vineyards produced its first wine in 1986 with the production of 450 cases. The winery's first five vintages were produced in a small winery adjacent to one of Talley Farms’ vegetable coolers. In the fall of 1991, a winery was completed at the foot of the Rincon Vineyard. A 12,000 square foot barrel and case goods storage building was added in 2000, followed by a new tasting room in 2002. Talley Vineyards currently produces about 36,000 cases annually.  Brian and Johnine Talley own and operate Talley Vineyards, while Brian, Todd, Ryan and Rosemary Talley manage Talley Farms.

OUR CALIFORNIA TABLE: CELEBRATING THE SEASONS WITH THE TALLEY FAMILY

The beautiful coffee table-style book traces the four-generation legacy of the Talley family, one of California’s most notable agricultural families with roots in the Central Coast dating back to the 1940’s.

The inspiring story, written by Brian Talley, president of Talley Vineyards and Talley Farms, features more than 50 of the family’s most beloved recipes accompanied by stunning images from photographer Jeremy Ball. The collectible book tells how the family business grew from humble, Depression-era origins to become one of California’s leading producers of fresh vegetables and the maker of acclaimed estate bottled wines. The recipes are grouped season-to-season to showcase the best bounty of each Talley harvest offering the family’s take on such regional classics as Grilled Chicken with Lemon and Wilted Greens, Rock Cod Veracruz, Honey-Glazed Quail with Grilled Radicchio and Red Onions and Dungeness Crab with Pink Sauce.

Focusing on a wide range of produce, including bell peppers, spinach, Napa cabbage, lemons, avocados and Brussels sprouts, Our California Table emphasizes true farm to table cuisine and wine pairing.

Talley Vineyards established its first plantings in 1982, one of the only wineries in the Arroyo Grande Valley viticultural area, which has some of the coolest temperatures for grape growing in the state. Since its first vintage was released in 1986, Talley Vineyards has won wide acclaim for its estate grown Chardonnay and Pinot Noir and is recognized as a benchmark producer of these varietals.

Profits from the sale of Our California Table benefit the Fund for Vineyard and Farm Workers. Established in 2004 by Talley and his wife, Johnine, the fund provides grants to non-profit organizations that assist San Luis Obispo County agricultural workers and their families. It has raised more than $600,000 since its inception, with a goal to establish a $1 million endowment so the fund can continue in perpetuity.

WWW.TALLEYVINEYARDS.COM
WWW.TALLEYFARMSFRESHHARVEST.COM
WWW.LASVENTANASRANCH.COM


GABE GARCIA - HEAD CHEF OF TIERRA SUR AT HERZOG WINE CELLARS - 10 MISTAKES YOU SHOULD NEVER MAKE WHEN GRILLING

10 MISTAKES YOU SHOULD NEVER MAKE WHEN GRILLING: 

1) Don't overcrowd the grill. Don't make the mistake of favoring quantity over quality. By crowding the meat you are compromising on the best part about cooking over open fire: the crust. Cooking in shifts might take a little bit longer, but your steaks will be grilled perfectly.

2) Don't jump the gun. If you've just turned the fire on and are itching to get going, DON’T! You'll need at least 10 minutes to heat a gas grill and 20 to heat a charcoal grill. We repeat: heat the grill fully before you start cooking, or your food will stick so badly, you'll want to throw your grates out and start over. Be patient.

3) Skip the sauce. We know, it's called barbecue sauce. Ignore that compelling logic and avoid using sugary sauces at all cost. You don't need to hide your meat behind sweet, heavy sauces that coat your grates and cause ugly flare ups. Use spice rubs to flavor your meat, and if you MUST use a sauce, use it only at the very end.

4) Menu Plan.  Do yourself a favor and plan for some non-BBQ items on the menu. It's a good idea to make sure you have some food that can be cooked indoors or prepared in advance, so you don't overwhelm the grill, or the griller. If you're entertaining, having food that's ready to go right away will take a load of pressure off, so you can man the fire, stress free.

 5) Start with a clean machine. Making sure your grates are clean before you get started will help you avoid any fiery accidents or food that sticks to the grill. Invest in a new grill brush whenever you see loose bristles.

6) Leave the lid alone.  By now, you are well on your way to grill mastery, so don't stop now! After searing your food on the hot section of your grill, move it to the cooler section and close the lid. Don't peek, either. A watched steak cooks unevenly!

7) Let your meat rest. Fight all urges to slice into the meat for at least 10 minutes. Yes, ten whole minutes are necessary for your meat or chicken to rest before you start cutting! The juices that got released during cooking need to redistribute in order to give you a juicy, flavorful protein. Skipping this step WILL result in dry meat.

8) Grill beef at room temperature. Ever been to a restaurant or cooked a steak that had a perfectly charred crust, cooked for the right amount of time, but when you cut into it, the interior was a hint away from still mooing? Firing a cold steak will result in meat that's cooked unevenly. Allow your meat to come all the way to room temperature before cooking for best results every time.

9) Cut against the grain. Meat muscle fibers generally run in one direction, and you want to slice the meat across those lines of muscle fibers. Even if you have one of those weird cuts of meat that has a grain that switches direction half way through, do it. The difference between shoe leather and melt in your mouth could literally be the angle that you are holding your knife.

10) Use the right tools. You need BBQ tools that are formulated to keep you safe while grilling, primarily by keeping your hands away from fire. Use long handled tongs and spatulas only, and be on guard to swat away wandering plastic forks attached to people who are itching to get their hands on one of your famous burgers straight off the grill. Pro tip: use a thermometer with a non-contact infrared sensor for perfectly cooked meat.

WWW.TIERRASURATHERZOG.COM
WWW.KOSHER.COM


No comments:

Post a Comment

09/22 SUSAN ZIRINSKY, 48 HOURS, NATIONAL GREAT AMERICAN POT PIE DAY, ROSE LEVY BERANBAUM, THE PIE AND PASTRY BIBLE, STEVE EVANS, THE MOVIE GUY

IN HONOR OF NATIONAL GREAT AMERICAN POT PIE DAY WE HAVE AWARD-WINNING BAKER, COOKBOOK AUTHOR AND BLOGGER ROSE LEVY BERANBAUM  Rose Levy ...