Tuesday, January 13, 2015

01/13 GRANT PETERSON, EAT BACON DON'T JOG, FRANK PELLEGRINO SR., ROA'S RESTAURANT, LA ART SHOW

GRANT PETERSEN – AUTHOR, EAT BACON, DON’T JOG 

Walk, lift weights, spend time outside, cut the carbs, eat a lot of healthy fat. Does that sound tough? No—and that's the point. A life well lived need not be as uncomfortable as a poorly fitted bike seat!”
Grant Petersen takes an evolutionary approach to health, fun, and life in his new book with the counterintuitive title – Eat Bacon, Don’t Jog!

In the blur of New Year’s resolution diet stories…Here’s a chance to talk to Grant about his refreshing approach to food and fitness.

EAT BACON, DON’T JOG Get Strong. Get Lean. No BS! The studies are in. Fat isn’t the villain. From “A Call for a Low-Carb Diet That Embraces Fat”  published in the New York Times (9/2/14) to the cover of TIME  boasting “Eat Butter” (6/23/14), the diet Grant Petersen has been following for years has serious science backing it up. But he knew that all along.

EAT BACON, DON’T JOG: Get Strong. Get Lean. No Bullshit. (November) is a frank, no nonsense food and fitness guide that gets to the bottom of why eating fat actually makes us thin, and shorter exercises yield better results than long aerobic slogs. In his trademark rallying voice, Petersen details how to start a high fat / low carb diet and tells us why we should trade long exercises that don’t work for quicker ones that do.

Petersen, the bestselling author of Just Ride (which Dave Eggers called “the bible for bicycle riders”), says at least 75% of daily calories should come from fat. In 100 pithy and humorous essays, he knocks carbohydrates for messing with blood-sugar levels and shows why, if you want to get strong and lean, fat is king.

Petersen distills his physiological research into a fun, breezy, and passionate guide to healthy living—all without joint destroying marathons or force binging kale. At age 60, he is in the best shape of his life with the blood panel to prove it. (His Triglyceride score is an incredible 39.)

Cleverly named recipes—Mockaroons, Japaneasy Soup, Butter Sushi, and Fun with Cream—are included. Readers will also learn the tenets of muscle building, without razzle-dazzle theatrics or tons of expensive, shiny equipment.  Kettlebells, an ab wheel, and one’s own body weight can insure a tough workout with major results.

We’re in the midst of a dietary sea change. The evidence that low-fat diets lead to obesity is overwhelming. With EAT BACON, DON’T JOG, Petersen has made high fat / low carb diets accessible and easy to start.  His three main points should not be forgotten:
1) Lowering your insulin is your salvation.
2) Fat is your friend.
3) Your excess body fat is due to the high-carb food you eat, not the exercise you don’t do.

EAT BACON, DON’T JOG celebrates a new kind of thinking and a new way of life, debunking the most common assumptions about diet and fitness. Not all calories are created equal. Here is a most enjoyable guide to the diet that has everyone’s attention.

About the Author:  Grant Petersen, 60, is the founder and owner of Rivendell Bicycle Works and the author of the bestselling book Just Ride. He has been featured in Outside and Men’s Journal, among other magazines. He lives with his family in Walnut Creek, California, and online at Rivbike.com.


FRANK PELLEGRINO SR. – RAO’S RESTAURANT – RAO’S HOLLYWOOD WILL BE ONE OF THE RESTAURANTS SERVING AT THE LA ART SHOW / OPENING NIGHT PREMIERE-PARTY ON 1/14

The Rao family arrived in New York from the southern Italian town of Pollo, near Naples, in the 1880s and settled amid the scattering of shacks and tenement buildings that were then beginning to sprout up in East Harlem. Charles Rao was a child when his mother and father arrived in New York, which meant he grew up with the distinct advantage of speaking English at the time most of the immigrant Italians were still struggling with the language. A bright and resourceful young man, Charles Rao bought a small saloon from the George Ehret Brewery at the corner of 114th Street and Pleasant Avenue in upper Manhattan. It was 1896. He called the place Rao's.

Charles Rao died in 1909 of a heart attack, and his brother Joseph took over and ran the restaurant until his death in 1930. By then Charlie's sons Louis and Vincent Rao had become the operating owners.

Louis and Vincent kept the bar open during Prohibition. One of the neighborhood families, the Caianos, made their own wine in their cellar next door, and it was pumped into Rao's basement through a hose. Rao's sold the wine for a dollar a bottle.

Louis ran the place until his death in 1958; then his brother Vincent took over. It was Vincent who turned Rao's from a local bar- a place neighborhood people used to call "the Hole" because it was (and is) four steps down from the street- into a restaurant where customers began to return even after they moved out of the neighborhood. Vincent loved food. He loved food. He loved to cook. He especially enjoyed grilling steaks and chops and chicken on a charcoal grill he set up on the street right outside the entry. The first Rao's regulars returned primarily for Vincent's steaks and chops.

By 1974, business had become so brisk that help was required in the form of Vincent's wife, Anna Pellegrino Rao, who arrived from their house next door with her pots and recipes. Anna was an unlikely restaurant chef. She was as elegant as her husband was homespun. Her look included a slim figure, a long gold cigarette holder, tightly upswept white-blond hair, white cashmere slacks and turtlenecks, gold sandals, monogrammed tinted glasses, and a single strand of pearls. When longtime regular Woody Allen made Broadway Danny Rose, he based Mia Farrow's look on Anna Rao's distinctive appearance. Anna's deft touch improved all the traditional Italian dishes, and Rao's became a favorite for a small army of steady customers.

Over the years, Rao's has probably survived because its owners have refused to change. They did not expand by filling the floors above the kitchen with additional tables, as they were advised. In the late sixties and early seventies, when East Harlem neighborhood began its decline, Rao's did not move downtown, as was suggested by many of its customers. As a result, Rao's has become a sort of time-capsule restaurant that allows its customers to dip back into an earlier period and experience a neighborhood restaurant as it was.

LA ART SHOW: THE OPENING NIGHT PERMIERE PARTY
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14
Patron Reception - $250: 7pm - 11pm
Patron VIP Program: 8pm
Vanguard Entrance - $200: 7:00-8:00PM
Opening Night Premiere Party - $125: 8:00-11:00PM
Los Angeles Convention Center / South Hall J & K

RAOSRESTAURANTS.COM


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